Chi or Qi is seen as a function that has many benefits in all parts of the body. This function is broad so it is possible to know and experience chi in many aspects within the body. QiGong means “energy work” and if you begin to practice it, you can begin to develop a greater awareness of and control over your own chi. When I say control, I mean learning how to channel chi in a manner so that it benefits all systems within the body, from bones, to muscle, organ, lymph, as well as the vascular and nervous system. Chi can serve to invigorate all aspects of your existence when it is channeled and used in a conscious and beneficial manner. It is at once meditation and low-impact work out. It also allows you to learn how to tune into your own energy field. It can lead to peace, joy, and bliss.

The path of tantra is the path of bliss, which uses an aspect of chi to “burn” through karma quickly (by always “going through” not around) The Chinese were introduced to tantra by the 4th century through Buddhism. Tantra did not begin as being about sex, but since tantra is based in bliss, sex soon became one of several branches of tantra. This system has its basis in understanding how energy flows can be sustained in order to bring healing and transformation.

I began practice with QiGong in late 2008. I learned White Crane QiGong. This is the same method of QiGong taught to the Shaloin monks who were tasked to protect the emperor of China. Many movies have been made that have turned these men into mythical creatures. While I cannot say that I learned to fly (like so many fictional characters are made to do) by learning White Crane, I did learn how to learn to tune into my own energy in a more deep and contemplative way. It led to removing many blocks, which is stored emotional energy that every person has and is the genesis of many neurosis’ that people suffer from.

QiGong is made up of a series of movements, each with a name to identify them. I noticed when doing certain movements that I could feel my energy either being spread out or pushed down, or moved around in a way that I could notice and later feel more and more. By having a quiet mind listening to the right kind of music, you can wind up in an almost trance-like state, one in which you are as calm as a quiet lake and moving slowly, gently, but purposefully.

I found that I could relate to QiGong without ever knowing precisely what the movements were for. It was clear to me that by practicing this discipline that it was having beneficial effects and I could feel Qi flowing in a way that it had note done before.. I think that Westerners do well with QiGong because before you can silence the mind through meditation, you can find a deep state of calm and alertness while keeping your body busy with the movements.

QiGong has the benefit of helping to release stuck energy. If you are already familiar with energy or are in the midst of a kundalini awakening, you might find this practice very helpful in helping to speed the release of blocked energy. I have mentioned QiGong many times in my blog but I have not gone into it in any real depth. It is one of only a very few disciplines that I have practiced in my life. It helped release many blocks in my body, mind, and heart. It is the path by which silence enters you and makes of you an even greater silence. It can open your experience to the mysteries of the world of energy.

The method that is being shown in the video is nearly identical to the QiGong that I practice. It is being called Shaolin QiGong. I suspect, though, that this is used in order to capture an eager Western audience who knows about the Shaolin monks. This is White Crane. The wonderful thing is that you can set up the video and follow along in front of your t.v. or computer. It is helpful to make the movements as graceful as you can. It is not forced, but is a mix of attention, purpose, force, and response. You will begin to feel effects, which are subtle at first, but as you go along you will be better able to tune into the silence and the energy that awaits you. Instead of expecting any effects, just wait for them. If nothing emerges, just keep going and don’t worry about it. In time you will grow to become familiar with what it can do for you. In China is was felt that this movement was a way to gently tone the body without wasting energy and it was possible to slowly begin to store chi in the body through the bones and marrow. This might be true, but I think what is certainly true is that it leads to a calmer and more peaceful state of mind where you can meet the chi and see what it is doing. One imporrant tip: in most movements it is important to watch the movement of your hands. Doing this does something akin to helping to complete an energetic circuit. In the video, watch for when the monk looks at his hands for certain moves (but not all). These are important.

All of the movements have a purpose. A lot is done through the hands and arms as a way to move your energy around you. Some movements are like raking through the larger energy field while other movements are there to help compress or pull in the energy. I think it is very much like a massage of the energy body. If you find yourself feeling uneasy, nauseous or clammy after practicing for a week or two, consider that the energy is working very well for you. If this does present itself to you, keep going because a lot can be done in a short period of time. Additionally, if you go to Yotube you will find many videos on QiGong and they can help you to understand what this very old method can done for you. Happy Qi travels…

This video will explain the effects of Chi and the benefits of QiGong on the body and mind