I have observed that dietary changes is a natural result of listening to your body and feeling where it’s needing you to go in regards to diet. I feel that in awakening your body will absolutely let you know. In fact, some of it will feel automatic at times. Have you noticed this? You wonder for hours on end what you should be eating to help assist matters only to find you have a dream, a sudden craving, or some other odd synchronistic event and blam! Problem solved!

I’ve discussed foods and how they are known to impact your energy by working with the body, so I won’t go into that here now. But what I will share with you is how I discovered, during my “dark night of the soul” a spice that helped a LOT. It still has an impact on me, and I hope it helps you, too. Drum roll, please:

INDIAN CURRY.

I will say that curry hasn’t been a favorite of mine, at least not historically, so it took experimenting and cooking with some inspired friends who really like curry to get in the groove. I think its what you are used to eating. If you have children, trycooking with light amounts of curry; they will likely not like it at first if they are used to traditional Western cooking, but they might find themselves coming to like it better later on.

I really like Thai curries….red, green..all of it…but they don’t do the same for me what Indian curry does. Madras curry is known as the hottest, and curry, being a blend, really varies on who is doing the blending! Today, curry powder may include cloves, cardamon, ginger, nutmeg, fennel, caraway, ajowan seeds, dried basil, mustard seeds, mace, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, saffron or cinnamon. The mix depends on the cook. Curry recipes can be found in the cuisines of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and the Caribbean. It might be me, my body, and my energy, but it’s also worth a try to consider the Thai curries. I like trying to use it in unique ways as well as in recipes that are traditionally Indian. I’m currently dreaming up some soups to try it in once cold weather sets in here. I’ll also be living with a vegetarian soon, which will encourage me to try this spice melange in interesting new ways without meat as such a steady base. And the great thing is that curry adds such richness that it’s a wonderful compliment to vegetarian cooking.

Curry is a spice that actually is a blend of a handful of spices, so if you find your tastebuds telling you that what you are tasting is complex, then you are catching on. I like to play with its pairing with sweet and savory as a way to use it to it’s fullest advantage, from mild to strong depending on mood, want, or mere adventure.

I have found that the hottest Indian curry wasn’t very hot at all, the chillies added were what made the hot Indian dishes so spicy. But its possible to get curry that is very hot, my lical grocery doesnt have versions that have been exriciating at all (you need the Thai curries for that, or a curry blend with a lot of chillies in it). I’m lucky because I have two very good Asian markets in my area for good supplies when needed, and lots of locals whose brains I can pick for ideas for traditional uses for curry.

So give it a try, but let me know what you think! And if you have already delved into curry and love to cook, I’d be interested in hearing what your favorites are. I know I haven’t given direction on how much curry to use. I feel that flavoring with spices is best left to your taste as you go along. Strong or light? Only you will know!

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